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Need High-Performing Follow-Ups In Your Sales Email Campaigns? (use these)

Sales professionals are at the mercy of open rates, making a strong follow-up critical– especially if your initial email was left unread. Send a quality follow-up email with the help of our templates below.
Rocco Savage
Head of Growth

Looking for the best way to follow up with leads via email? We used the regie platform to generate sample follow-up emails for prospective clients who haven’t replied to your initial message(s). After each template, we’ll break down why it’s effective and how to make it your own, so let’s jump right in.

In this post you’ll find: 5 sales follow-up email templates, an overview of the tactics they leverage and instructions on how to customize a template for your own needs.

Subject Line: 15-Min Call {{!! DAY OF WEEK }}
{{!! RECIPIENT NAME }},

I've got a few more helpful data points to share if you've got some time this week. Highlights include:

{{! INSERT VALUE ADD 1 }}
{{! INSERT VALUE ADD 2 }}
{{! INSERT VALUE ADD 3 }}

How about [[timeslot]] to discuss how this applies to {{!! RECIPIENT COMPANY }}?

{{!! YOUR NAME}}



The Subject Line

"15-Min Call {{!! DAY OF WEEK }}"

We like this subject line because it couldn’t be more to the point, yet it’s highly personalized. The implication of sending a specific day is that you couldn’t send it to 100 people. Instead, its recipient can enjoy that the message was written just for them. All you need to do is check your calendar for availability and boom, you have a subject line.


The Intro Line

"I've got a few more helpful data points to share if you've got some time this week."


An intro line that’s conversational, it sounds like you’re picking up where you left off. We also like that it suggests you have more data to share (make sure you actually do) but you’re just going to give the highlights until you meet. It’s to the point, conversational and offers value.


The Body Copy

"Highlights include:
{{! INSERT VALUE ADD 1 }}
{{! INSERT VALUE ADD 2 }}
{{! INSERT VALUE ADD 3 }}"



Whether it’s a whitepaper, infographic, case study, ebook or otherwise, the “value adds” you choose to include should be somewhat personalized or, at the very least, chosen specifically for your lead’s company. 

In other words, don’t use the same value adds every time you use this template. You should take into consideration what your lead’s day-to-day looks like, what falls under their purview and the pain points they’re likely experiencing. Use this information to make the right choice for which value adds you use. 

Tip: Pay attention to the content that performs well as a value-add. Consider which options are most popular and how their popularity correlates with certain buyer personas.


The CTA


"How about [[timeslot]] to discuss how this applies to {{!! RECIPIENT COMPANY }}?"


The wording of this CTA clearly communicates what you’d like to discuss. Too often a CTA is haphazardly attached to the end of a message that makes a lot of promises and says something to the effect of, “so can I get on your calendar?” 

In addition to being actionable and clear, your CTAs should flow logically from your body content. Your lead first needs to understand why you’re reaching out, and second, why they should meet with you. This template’s CTA is effective at explaining why.


Subject Line: {{!! PROOF POINT }}
{{!! RECIPIENT NAME }},

Sometimes data can tell a better story than words. Here's how we've helped some customers in your space:

{{! PROOF POINT 1 }}
{{! PROOF POINT 2 }}
{{! PROOF POINT 3 }}

Based on this, would a quick call to discuss your process be of interest? 

{{!! YOUR NAME}}



The Subject Line

"{{!! PROOF POINT }}"


About as straightforward as a subject line can be, this one is also easy to make your own. A proof point is a piece of data or a statistic that depicts the success of your solution and/or customer base. 

What type of growth have your customers seen? How has your product or service helped them? Put it in quantifiable terms, a.k.a. data, and you’re done. Just make sure the customer data you’re using is relevant to your prospect. Usually, this means the same industry or title.


The Intro Line

"Sometimes data can tell a better story than words." 


Often an understated into line is just what your prospect needs. This one is useful because it explains the message’s aim- to provide relevant data without a bunch of words getting in the way. 


The Body Copy

"Here's how we've helped some customers in your space:
{{! PROOF POINT 1 }}
{{! PROOF POINT 2 }}
{{! PROOF POINT 3 }}"


The data you choose to include in this message’s body copy will make or break the email. Be as specific as possible. This template’s strength lies in the objectiveness of data, so you need to actually use numbers. Avoid statements like, “We helped grow X company’s customer base,” or “We streamline our customers’ content creation processes.” 

Instead, focus on metrics and how quickly these results were achieved. 

If a customer tripled their contact list in their first 5 months of using your product, don’t leave the 5 months out. That’s information your prospect should have. Don’t forget to use the value add from your subject line to help put it into context, then follow it with two or three more examples. 


The CTA

Based on this, would a quick call to discuss your process be of interest? 


This template’s CTA won’t be accused of being pushy. Not every CTA needs to ask for a meeting. Occasionally, a simple “are you interested?” is appreciated. 

It’s important that your emails cover a variety of approaches, not only for your own analysis, but to also address a range of personalities and preferences. For a CTA that’s low pressure and respectful, use the one in this template.


Subject Line: {{!! RECIPIENT NAME}}, {{!! RECIPIENT COMPANY }} & [[value-proposition]] (quick brief)
{{!! RECIPIENT NAME }},

A team of ten reps (like yours) can roll out a fully standardized, internally created campaign based on the buyer personas you’re already using– on day 1 of regie in your tech stack. 

Had to make sure the initial line gave you the info you clicked for. With that said, I last reached out three days ago, asking about {{RECIPIENT COMPANY}}’s current system for content strategy management. Between each of my messages, hopefully I’ve tapped into some topics that are relevant for you right now. 

If you’re available [[timeslot]] for a 15-min call, we can both learn more about where our companies might overlap. Hope to talk soon.

{{!! YOUR NAME}}


The Subject Line

"{{!! RECIPIENT NAME}}, {{!! RECIPIENT COMPANY }} & [[value-proposition]] (quick brief)"


We like this template’s subject line because it packs in relevant and personalized information. Your lead will see their name as well as their company’s in their inbox. And if you can get the value proposition right, they’ll see a solution that’s meaningful to them. 

The words “quick brief” in parentheses can be swapped out for any short summary quip, but adding them makes an important contribution to the subject line’s tone. They offset the potentially serious tone of the words that come before them, as well as the air of promise they connote. Without the little side note that (quick brief) creates, the subject line sounds more sales-y than conversational and more ostentatious than realistic. 

As a bonus, the word “quick” lets your reader know that if they click, whatever they’re getting into won’t take long. Adding small elements of the informal like this will help strike the balance between informative and honest that reps should set out to perfect. 


The Intro Line

"A team of ten reps (like yours) can roll out a fully standardized, internally created campaign based on the buyer personas you’re already using– on day 1 of regie in your tech stack." 

In the body copy, start with your value proposition right away. Consider the intro line your email’s thesis. Why should your lead agree to use your product or solution? Spell it out for them clearly and immediately. This works best if you can heavily personalize the value proposition, especially since that’s what your subject line promised to do. 

You can do this by breaking down a value proposition you already use into its specifics and applying it to what you know about your lead’s company. As this template is for follow-ups, we can assume you’ve already put in the time to research your lead. Use what you’ve found to create a value proposition just for them. 


The Body Copy

"Had to make sure the initial line gave you the info you clicked for. With that said, I last reached out three days ago, asking about {{RECIPIENT COMPANY}}’s current system for content strategy management. Between each of my messages, hopefully I’ve tapped into some topics that are relevant for you right now."


The next line helps to establish tone. You’ve just told your lead what you can do for them, now you need your humanity to shine through. The sentence, “Had to make sure I gave you the info you clicked for first,” is a way to do just that. Almost everything in sales is a balancing act. You want to come off as an ally, not a predator to your lead. You can do this by providing the “sales pitch” so to speak, but also by pulling back the curtain a bit.

Expand on this tone by mentioning that you’ve reached out before and explain what that message was about. Again, balance out the sales-y side of the message by offering a more human sentiment like “hopefully I’m tapping into relevant topics.” This shows you don’t want to assume anything and that you understand only your lead can provide the full picture.


The CTA


"If you’re available [[timeslot]] for a 15-min call, we can both learn more about where our companies might overlap. Hope to talk soon."

This is when you provide a specific timeslot to meet (you can link a calendar invite over the timeslot) and notate that the call will only take X amount of time. 

Subject Line: What do you need?  
{{!! RECIPIENT NAME }},

When it comes to content strategy, what do you feel {{!! RECIPIENT COMPANY }} needs? I’ve done some research and could make a few guesses, that’s what’s led me to reach out, but I’m interested in hearing it from you. 

A few areas of content strategy {{ !! SENDER COMPANY }} has solutions for:

  • Scalable analysis of sales campaigns 
  • A centralized platform for content creation, storage and management
  • Copy generation assistance powered by AI
  • Campaign standardization and visibility across sales teams

There’s more to say but if any of the areas I mentioned peak your interest, I’m available [[timeslot]] for a 15-min call. It’d be great to hear from you.

{{!! YOUR NAME}}



The Subject Line

"What do you need?"

“What do you need?” can sound a little rude, but that’s why some leads will be inspired to click. Humans can be defensive creatures and a subject line like this one taps into that. If you’re concerned about the way it might be perceived, try using “What does {{!! RECIPIENT COMPANY }} need?” instead. Or, “Re: question about your {{!! ASPECT OF THEIR WORK }}”

The Intro Line

"When it comes to content strategy, what do you feel {{!! RECIPIENT COMPANY }} needs? I’ve done some research and could make a few guesses, that’s what’s led me to reach out, but I’m interested in hearing it from you." 

Expand off the subject line with this template’s intro line. By adding more context to your question, anyone who clicked and expected a rude email will quickly realize that’s not the case. This intro line also gets down to the root of cold emailing. Reps are trying to confirm whether or not there’s a need for their product or service. Why not just ask?

The Body Copy

"A few areas of content strategy {{ !! SENDER COMPANY }} has solutions for:
  • Scalable analysis of sales campaigns 
  • A centralized platform for content creation, storage and management
  • Copy generation assistance powered by AI
  • Campaign standardization and visibility across sales teams"

Let your lead know that you have your own reasons for reaching out, but ultimately you’re interested in hearing from them. Preempt the inevitable, “why would I tell you?” with a bulleted list of solutions you provide. It’s okay to keep this list general, especially if you’re able to list quite a few options.

Many of our templates require sellers to be specific, but this one is designed to promote the full range of your solutions. By covering the length and width of what your company does, you’re likely to touch on an area of interest for your lead. 

The only stipulation is that you need to feel confident your lead is a fit. Information is always limited at this stage, but if you come away from researching with the thought that this lead might be a stretch, then this template is a stretch for them too. 


The CTA

There’s more to say but if any of the areas I mentioned peak your interest, I’m available [[timeslot]] for a 15-min call. It’d be great to hear from you.

Sometimes a vanilla CTA is just what you need. You can copy and paste this text verbatim into your next follow-up. Just don’t forget to add in your timeslot and calendar invite. 


Subject Line: If you enjoy proving reps wrong and have a sense of humor
{{!! RECIPIENT NAME }},

You’re reading this because I think it’s likely you’re experiencing [[painpoint]]. 

I think it’s likely you’re experiencing [[painpoint]] because:

  • {{!! REASON }}
  • {{!! REASON }}
  • {{!! REASON }}
  • {{!! REASON }}

Am I right? If you want to tell me no and actually hear my shock while you do it, a call [[timeslot]] is good for me. 

{{!! YOUR NAME}}


The Subject Line

"If you enjoy proving reps wrong and have a sense of humor"

This subject line is playful and unusual and is therefore likely to stand out. The tone of this subject line is also extremely dry, which is continued throughout the message. No one considers themself humorless, so a prospect is drawn in by the desire to validate that they do in fact have a sense of humor.  


The Intro Line

"You’re reading this because I think it’s likely you’re experiencing [[painpoint]]."

People don’t talk like this, especially not in sales emails. The combination of the first two lines gives a repetitive, slightly redundant and devoid of emotion type of feel, to evoke a tone that’s intentionally, but shockingly, dry. 

Sales emails typically ooze forced emotion because sellers want to take on a helpful, light-hearted tone. There’s nothing inherently wrong with aiming to sound upbeat, but because a certain tone is so prevalent, it’s easy for your emails can fall into the “sales-y” trap of sounding superficial. 

This doesn’t mean all your emails should be filled with satire and angst, but an occasional and well-executed counter to the typical sales email will help you appeal to buyers who are fed up with their inbox.  


The Body Copy

"I think it’s likely you’re experiencing [[painpoint]] because:
  • {{!! REASON }}
  • {{!! REASON }}
  • {{!! REASON }}
  • {{!! REASON }}"


There’s no outward joke in the email’s copy. The sense of humor comes from being able to understand and maybe even laugh at the message’s borderline unenthusiastic tone. It completely flips the energy of a typical sales email on its head, and in doing so, reverses the roles of vulnerability. 

List 3-4 reasons you assume your prospect is experiencing the pain point. These reasons can be the same reasons that you were convinced you should reach out in the first place. You need to make sure they’re persuasive, as this is where the bulk of the email’s effort comes from. Draft and edit your reasons a few times to really refine them. Get down to their root by asking yourself the question, “why?” until you can’t keep asking it. 

Take the sentence “Jane goes to the farmers market every week.” It expresses an idea, but it can be refined. Why does she go? To buy farm-fresh eggs. Why? She needs them for her quiche recipe. Why? Quiche is the best-selling item at her bakery. So the reason becomes, “Quiche is the best-selling item at your bakery and my company delivers up to four dozen locally-sourced farm-fresh eggs to your doorstep with less than 48 hr. notice.”


The CTA

"Am I right? If you want to tell me no and actually hear my shock while you do it, a call [[timeslot]] is good for me." 

If there is an actual joke in this template, it’s in the CTA. Instead of asking your prospect to confirm you’re right, ask them to confirm you’re wrong. This isn’t an example of reverse psychology, it’s just a strange request that continues the strange tone of the message up until its end. 

This template should be used selectively, as it’s not for everyone. But shuffling it into your outreach mix is an excellent way to account for personality variance and jolt awake prospects who are haphazardly scanning their inbox. 

For further guidance and support on your sales campaigns (and much more), consider experiencing a demo from regie. You can schedule one here.

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